Euler's Totient Function

Euler's totient function, also known as phi-function $\phi (n)$, is the number of integers between 1 and $n$ inclusive, which are coprime to $n$. Two numbers are coprime if their greatest common divisor equals $1$ ($1$ is considered to be coprime to any number).

Here are values of $\phi(n)$ for the first few positive integers: $$\begin{array}{|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|c|} \hline n & 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 5 & 6 & 7 & 8 & 9 & 10 & 11 & 12 & 13 & 14 & 15 & 16 & 17 & 18 & 19 & 20 & 21 \\ \hline \phi(n) & 1 & 1 & 2 & 2 & 4 & 2 & 6 & 4 & 6 & 4 & 10 & 4 & 12 & 6 & 8 & 8 & 16 & 6 & 18 & 8 & 12 \\ \hline \end{array}$$

Properties

The following properties of Euler totient function are sufficient to calculate it for any number:

Thus, we can get $\phi (n)$ through factorization of $n$ (decomposition of $n$ into a product of its prime factors).
If $n = {p_1}^{a_1} \cdot {p_2}^{a_2} \cdot \ldots \cdot {p_k}^{a_k}$, where $p_i$ are prime factors of $n$,

$$\phi (n) = \phi ({p_1}^{a_1}) \cdot \phi ({p_2}^{a_2}) \cdot \ldots \cdot \phi ({p_k}^{a_k})$$ $$= ({p_1}^{a_1} - {p_1}^{a_1 - 1}) \cdot ({p_2}^{a_2} - {p_2}^{a_2 - 1}) \cdot \ldots \cdot ({p_k}^{a_k} - {p_k}^{a_k - 1})$$ $$= n \cdot \left(1 - \frac{1}{p_1}\right) \cdot \left(1 - \frac{1}{p_2}\right) \cdot \ldots \cdot \left(1 - \frac{1}{p_k}\right)$$

Implementation

C++ implementation using factorization in $O(\sqrt{n})$ Show/Hide

int phi(int n) {
    int result = n;
    for(int i = 2; i * i <= n; ++i)
        if(n % i == 0) {
            while(n % i == 0)
                n /= i;
            result -= result / i;
        }
    if(n > 1)
        result -= result / n;
    return result;
}

Python 3 implementation Show/Hide

def phi(n):
    result = n
    i = 2
    while i * i <= n:
        if n % i == 0:
            while n % i == 0:
                n //= i
            result -= result // i
        i += 1
    if n > 1:
        result -= result // n
    return result

Applications of Euler's totient function

The most famous and important property of Euler's function is expressed in Euler's theorem :
$a^{\phi (m)} \equiv 1 \pmod m$ if $a$ and $m$ are relatively prime.

In the particular case when $m$ is prime, Euler's theorem turns into the so-called Fermat's little theorem :
$a^{m - 1} \equiv 1 \pmod m$

Euler's theorem occurs quite often in practical applications, for example, modular multiplicative inverse.

General Euler's theorem

There is less known version of Euler's theorem for not coprime $x$ and $m$. That is for arbitrary $x, m$ and $n \geq \log_2 m$:

$$x^{n}\equiv x^{\varphi(m)+[n \bmod \varphi(m)]} \mod m$$

To prove this let's start with the following. Assume we want to calculate $x^n \bmod m$. We should note that $an \bmod am = a(n \bmod m)$. Indeed if $n = d m + r, r < m$ then $an = a d m + ar, ar < am$. Now assume that $p_1, \dots, p_t$ are common divisors of $x$ and $m$. Let $a=p_1^{k_1} \dots p_t^{k_t}$ be the number in which all such divisors taken with the same degree as in $m$ and $k$ is the smallest number such that $a$ divides $x^k$. Then we can write:

$$x^n \bmod m = \left(\dfrac{x^k}{a}\right)ax^{n-k}\bmod a \left(\dfrac m a \right) = $$ $$=\dfrac{x^k}{a} a \left[x^{n-k} \bmod \left(\dfrac m a\right)\right]\bmod m = x^k\left[x^{n-k} \bmod \left(\dfrac m a\right)\right]\bmod m$$

Now we see that $x$ and $\tfrac m a$ are coprime, so if we consider powers of $x$ modulo $m$ they will have pre-period at most $k$ and its period will divide $\varphi\left(\dfrac m a\right)$. It is easy to see that $k \leq \varphi(m)$, since $k \leq \log_2 m$ and $\varphi \geq \log_2 m$. And we can use the period $\varphi(m)$ instead of $\varphi\left(\tfrac{m}{a}\right)$, because $\varphi(a)$ always divides $\varphi(ab)$.

This gives the desired formula:

$$ x^n \equiv x^{\varphi(m)} x^{(n - \varphi(m)) \bmod \varphi(m)} \bmod m \equiv x^{\varphi(m)+[n \bmod \varphi(m)]} \mod m$$

Practice Problems